Encouraging appropriate levels of commitment and participation from your child

Admissions officers at selective colleges and universities want to see commitment to activities over time, rather than a series of single-year affiliations with various clubs and committees.  The most selective institutions value leadership positions — captaining a team, editing a school publication, holding student government office — although, once again, no single formula guarantees admission.  Commitment and … Continue reading Encouraging appropriate levels of commitment and participation from your child

Types of activities and how to select them

High school students can choose from a range of activities, including school-based clubs, teams, and theatrical productions; organized groups or experiences outside of school; paying jobs; and independent hobbies and interests that they pursue completely on their own (without the formal sponsorship or structure of any organization).  Some young people have family responsibilities that take … Continue reading Types of activities and how to select them

Why the narrative that your child’s interests and activities tell matters

For admissions officers, a strong folder tells a candidate's story, which essentially means that the many pieces of the application come together and help define the student and what he brings to the table.  Let me give you an example in which extracurricular activities played a key role in letting admissions officers know who an … Continue reading Why the narrative that your child’s interests and activities tell matters

How activities and interests contribute to your child’s narrative

In a preliminary consultation, I always ask students to itemize for me their activities and interests, including the number of years they have pursued each one, ways in which they have demonstrated leadership, and the amount of time they generally devote to a given pursuit.  I probe a little bit to determine the pastimes about … Continue reading How activities and interests contribute to your child’s narrative